Saturday, March 2, 2019

Are you down with EPP?

Crafting on the go? Serious crafting on the go? With artisan results? History? And a warm blanket at the end of it all?

Yes, please!

For several years, I've admired pictures of English paper piecing in progress. I wasn't considering getting into it, though. I've been knitting in earnest for years, and if my hands are moving, isn't it usually because I have yarn in them? So I didn't think I'd have time to take on a new project. I'm a Knitter! But I'm a Knitter who wants blankets and knitted blankets take forever. For-ev-er. I give you my mitered squares blanket that I've been working on for 8 years, and which is still not even halfway finished.




I've also tried crocheting blankets from leftover yarns from knitting projects. I have two in some stage of progress or other.

  


And then... just before Christmas I got this crazy idea. Why not take up EPP? There were sales on Christmas fabrics and quilting notions. I could have a blanket or two done by next year and won't that be amazing?

Whoa, there Kristi!
Slow down.
Hold up.

Maybe a smaller project would be in order to see if I actually even LIKED it. I made some coasters for my sister in law using a tutorial I can't seem to locate anymore.



Not perfect, but cute. And I became a hexagon addict. I'm buying up fat quarters and pre-cuts in grays and purples with the idea of making a ripple blanket of hexagons. I'm about 150 hexies in now. Aren't these purples so pretty? And aren't these grays so elegant? And the pops of green so fun?





I should probably learn how to do some hand quilting and binding on a couple of smaller projects before this turns into a completed quilt top and I make a mess of finishing the project. hmmm....

Links to sites and videos that I found really helpful for getting started (there are a bazillion of videos out there with almost exactly the same information... my favorite had excellent tips for efficiency).


  • Best video I found for making life easy and keeping things efficient with the basting and sewing together of hexagons, etc. 




1 comment:

  1. This might be just as dangerous for you as it has been for me so I'll pass this tip along:

    A quilter friend of mine suggested I start getting pillow cases from thrift stores as a MUCH less expensive source of cotton fabric for the grocery bags that I make. I usually look for single pillow cases for what I'm doing, but they often have sets with quite a lot of fabric in them. Sheets would work, too, of cours.

    Between that, neck ties (for bag straps) and sweaters to recycle, I do NOT leave a thrift store empty handed.

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